Re-Thinking Your Content Assembly Line

Re-Thinking Your Content Assembly Line

OpenText Hightail

While many companies have established processes in place for producing content within predictable schedules and budgets, many of these processes are essentially assembly lines—with content moving from silo to silo, with fairly blind handovers in-between (from researcher to planner to writer to designer, etc.).

But great content can’t be made the same way we make toaster ovens.
It’s unique. Crafted. Specific to its audience, market and strategic context.

This on-demand Content Marketing Institute webinar, sponsored by OpenText Hightail, examines the problems with the assembly line approach to content creation, and why you should consider an alternative that’s far more collaborative and creative (and also leads to way better content).

You will learn:

  • Why most content teams default to an assembly-line approach
  • How content assembly lines can limit creativity and close down options
  • Best practices for breaking down silos and getting your team really working together
  • The types of content that shouldn’t come from an assembly line, and why a “content group hug” is often a better approach 

Speakers

Doug Kessler
Co-Founder and Creative Director
Velocity Partners


Doug Kessler is co-founder and creative director of Velocity Partners, the London- and New York-based B2B content marketing agency (now part of the Next 15 group). Velocity won the Content Marketing Institute’s Agency of the Year in 2016 and Doug refuses to stop mentioning it. He's written a lot about content marketing and has been an annoyingly ubiquitous presence on the speaking circuit too.

Stephanie Stahl
General Manager
Content Marketing Institute

As General Manager of CMI, Stephanie leads the brand’s event, digital, print, and e-learning operations. Previously, she served as VP of Content Marketing for UBM’s Technology portfolio, providing strategic guidance on content development, content optimization, audience engagement, and go-to-market platforms for technology clients. She has worked for UBM for more than two decades, helping shape new multimedia content and event offerings. She also served as Editor in Chief of InformationWeek for many years.